The scalpel and the silver bear

When Lia Lee Entered the American medical system, diagnosed as an epileptic, her story became a tragic case history of cultural miscommunication. It was this imbalance, according to the medicine man, that was causing the people to become sick. Navajos traditionally do not allow themselves to be cut open and are afraid to touch the dead.

Navajo children were told that their culture and lifeways were inferior, and they were made to feel they could never be as good as white people. With journalist Van Pelt's help, Alvord tells her life story and describes the culture of her people, setting both in the striking, seemingly limitless landscape of the Southwest.

So Navajo children do not raise their hands in class. Not being able to get a job in Crownpoint, she went to Albuquerque where she was offered two jobs, one as a social worker and another paying much less as a medical research assistant at the University of New Mexico.

Elizabeth Cohen Van Pelt is a journalist. Did you engage with the material and learn something new. Alvord worked to combine modern medical practice with traditional Navajo healing beliefs of walking in beauty and "living in balance and harmony" p.

What is meant by the concept of Walking in Beauty. What reader s is it aimed at. Later in medical school she was viewed as "remote and disinterested" for similar reasons p. As a surgeon she met some of these accident victims on the operating table in Gallup.

Ceremony Medicine The case featured in this chapter is Carolyn Yazzie, who has breast cancer. Later in medical school she was viewed as "remote and disinterested" for similar reasons p.

What steps in that direction does she take in this chapter. Subject matter preparation was not the only problem she faced in college. Can this kind of prejudice be overcome. She voices some important lessons for biomedicine in incorporating culture into practices; however, she falls short at fully convincing a skeptical reader to see her stories as anything more than anecdotal references to her own experiences.

This book review was published in the October 6, issue Vol. While she got into medical school partly because of affirmative action, this meant that she was constantly tested. Ceremony Medicine The case featured in this chapter is Carolyn Yazzie, who has breast cancer.

What saved her was her "strong reading background. Making it Academically on the Rez Jon Reyhner Lori Arviso Alvord, surgeon and university administrator, has to be an example of academic success for students in Navajo schools.

She was fortunate to be able to attend Dartmouth College where there is strong support for American Indians. In applied anthropology collaboration with the community you are working with should be paramount. Should she need to explain and justify this relationship. Working within her traditional culture, which strongly resists the removal of organs from the body, she soon realized that a trusting relationship with the patient and harmony in the operating room were as necessary as the correct procedure to the success of the operation and the recovery process.

She majored in the social science and graduated from Dartmouth in Chantways What is a chantway. Combine that with having lived in the American Southwest, particularly in New Mexico, and I found this book an interesting read. What are her two worlds.

Add to that, Lori is female. The medicine man had been correct. While in medical school and residency she felt very much separated from her Indian heritage and was glad to start her practice of surgery in the Indian Health Service and eventually to return to the Indian Hospital at Gallup, New Mexico, just fifty miles from the reservation where she grew up.

Healers should lead by example - how do we stop tearing each other down. From there she went to Stanford University for medical school and a surgical residency. The author, the first Navajo woman surgeon, tells the story of how she was able to cut across cultural, class, and educational borders to become a part of the medical world; and discusses how she came to understand the power of Navajo thinking about health and illness to impact some of modern.

Dr.

The Scalpel and the Silver Bear - Introduction and Chapter One, Chantways Summary & Analysis

Alvord was born to a Navajo father and a Caucasian mother--bilagaana--and felt from the beginning that she was walking the path between two worlds. Her childhood was spent on an Indian reservation and she was very close to her Indian grandmother.

She was fortunate to be able to attend Dartmouth. Get this from a library! The scalpel and the silver bear. [Lori Arviso Alvord; Elizabeth Cohen] -- The author, the first Navajo woman surgeon, tells the story of how she was able to cut across cultural, class, and educational borders to become a part of the medical world; and discusses how she.

A large part of The Scalpel and the Silver Bear concerns how Dr. Alvord worked to combine modern medical practice with traditional Navajo healing beliefs of walking in beauty and "living in balance and harmony" (p. ).

And now, in bringing these principles to the world of medicine, The Scalpel and the Silver Bear joins those few rare works, such as Healing and the Mind, whose ideas have changed medical practices-and our understanding of the elleandrblog.coms: The Scalpel and the Silver Bear: The First Navajo Woman Surgeon Combines Western Medicine and Traditional Healing Jan 1, Currently unavailable.

The Scalpel and the Silver Bear. by Dr.

The scalpel and the silver bear

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The Scalpel and the Silver Bear Summary & Study Guide